Bullying is repeated, unwanted or aggressive behaviour meant to intimidate and make others uncomfortable, scared or hurt. It’s often based on the other person’s appearance, culture, race, religion, ethnicity, gender identity or sexual orientation. Actions can include threats, rumours, or attacking someone physically or verbally. In Canada, up to 25 percent of children in grades four to six have been bullied and one in 10 children have bullied others. Among cyberbullying victims, 73 percent report receiving threatening or aggressive texts, emails or instant messages.
Cyberbullying can lead to psychological effects in victims, including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and physical illness. Bullying is a serious issue in Canada and the government is now beginning to implement anti-bullying legislation in schools to help stop it.

Fast Facts

  • 7% of Canadian parents report having a child that has been a victim of bullying.
  • Those who use chat sites and social networks are three times more likely than non-users to be cyberbullied.
  • LGBTQ youth are three times more likely to be bullied than heterosexual youth.
  • Researchers say that bullying usually ends within 10 seconds of an intervention by peers.
Nearly 43% of kids have been bullied online. 1 in 4 had it happen more than once.

STANDING UP TO CYBERBULLYING

You have the responsibility to yourself and others to be digitally smart. Digital behaviour can include reading and writing on an online forum, posting a photo to Facebook, and using other social media outlets. With the wide-use of social media among young people today, it’s important for youth to be aware of their actions as well as those of others. They have the power to be advocates by speaking out and to help prevent cyberbullying. You can promote digital responsibility by spreading positivity and putting an end to hate by standing up to negative actions online.

Cyberbullying can have negative long-term consequences that can hinder the livelihood of children. People may not always be aware that they are cyberbullying because they are not aware of online etiquette and, moreover, the ability to be anonymous online or hide behind a computer screen can also make it easier for people to say or do things that they wouldn’t through face-to-face communication. Cyberbullying can be prevented by promoting healthy relationships and making dignity and respect core values among youth.

Bullying is unwanted behavior, meant to make others feel uncomfortable, scared or hurt. It’s used to gain power and is often based on the other person’s appearance or sexual orientation. In the U.S., one in four children are reported to be bullied and one in five children have admitted to bullying others. Cyberbullying has become increasingly common among youth. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 52 percent of students have reported being bullied online. Cyberbullying can lead to psychological effects in victims, including depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and physical illness. Bullying has always been a serious issue, but with increasing access to technology, youth are being exposed to more bullying than ever before.

Fast Facts

  • Those who use chat sites and social networks are three times more likely than non-users to be bullied online.
  • Those who use chat sites and social networks are three times more likely than non-users to be bullied online.
  • On average, more than 160,000 students miss school every day due to fear of being bullied.
  • Students who experience bullying say help from peers is more helpful than help from an educator or self-actions.
Nearly 43% of kids have been bullied online. 1 in 4 had it happen more than once.

STANDING UP TO CYBERBULLYING

You have the responsibility to yourself and others to be digitally smart. Digital behavior can include reading and writing on an online forum, posting a photo to Facebook, and using other social media outlets. With the wide-use of social media among young people today, it’s important for youth to be aware of their actions as well as those of others.

Cyberbullying can have negative long-term consequences that can hinder the livelihood of children. People may not always be aware that they are cyberbullying because they are not aware of online etiquette and, moreover, the ability to be anonymous online or hide behind a computer screen can also make it easier for people to say or do things that they wouldn’t through face-to-face communication.

Cyberbullying can be prevented by promoting healthy relationships and making dignity and respect core values among youth. You can promote digital responsibility by spreading positivity and putting an end to hate by standing up to negative actions online.