Canada’s population is made up of many races, ethnicities, genders and backgrounds who still face varying degrees of discrimination on a daily basis. A quarter of Canadians say they have experienced racism, and nearly half of respondents in a recent study said that Canada is facing a racism problem. In 2017, Canada appeared before the United Nation’s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination to defend their stance on fighting racial discrimination. The panel concluded there was concern over the high rates of incarceration of Indigenous people. There was also concern over the detention of asylum seekers and racial profiling by police.

Fast Facts

  • Hate crimes against Muslims in Canada increased 253% over 4 years.
  • The most violent crimes in 2017 targeted sexual orientation.
  • 1 in 5 Canadians have been discriminated against at work because of their gender.
  • Despite encompassing less than 5% of the total Canadian population, Indigenous people make up 27% of the federal prison population.

FINDING A SOLUTION

Over the past 25 years Canada has seen an increase in minority groups, immigration and an overall greater diversity. We pride ourselves on being tolerant and multicultural, but these qualities don’t make us immune from discrimination. To get rid of discrimination we need to first acknowledge that it’s a problem. We need to have more workplace diversity training, continue research and data collection on discrimination, and work together to dismantle harmful prejudices.

The population of the United States is made up of many races, ethnicities, genders and backgrounds, who still face varying degrees of discrimination on a daily basis. Forty-two percent of African Americans have experienced racial violence, and four in 10 LGBTQ youth say the community they live in is not accepting of them. In January 2017, the U.S. government introduced an executive order that put a hold on all refugee settlement. The executive order also banned entry of travelers from seven different countries.

Fast Facts

  • Almost 75% of LGBTQ youth are more honest about themselves online than in the real world.
  • In 2016, 84,989 people were admitted to the U.S. as refugees.
  • Nearly 1.4 million adults in the United States identify as transgender.
  • As of 2017, one-fifth of the world’s migrants live in the United States.

FINDING A SOLUTION

To get rid of discrimination it needs to be first acknowledged as a problem. There needs to be more workplace diversity training, continued research and data collection on discrimination, and we all need to work together to dismantle harmful prejudices. We are stronger together—we need one America unified if we want to bring together the country and end discrimination.