Thirteen percent of Canadians are in a state of food insecurity, which means they are unable to access a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. Without enough food, many people feel the effects of short-term hunger, like headaches, nausea and the inability to concentrate.
Each month, over 850,000 Canadians require help from food banks—more than one third of these individuals are children and youth. People seeking food assistance come from all walks of life. Employment is no guarantee that someone will never struggle to provide enough food for their family. In fact, nearly one in six households that accessed a food bank in 2016 included someone who was employed.

Fast Facts

  • Nunavut has the highest documented rate of food insecurity for any Indigenous population living in a developed country.
  • Food bank use in Canada in 2016 was 28% higher than in 2008.
  • The root cause of hunger in Canada is low income, which affects over 4 million Canadians at any given time.
  • 1 in 5 households in the territories are food insecure.
Food bank use in Canada in 2016 was 28% higher than in 2008.

WHY ARE FOOD BANKS NECESSARY?

People who access food banks come from all walks of life. Some people need support over longer periods, but most require help only occasionally or for a short period of time. Hunger leads to long-term health conditions, especially in young children, and is a barrier to academic success.

A food package may make the difference for a family trying to get back on their feet after a crisis. It can mean that a child doesn’t go to bed hungry, or doesn’t get sick and miss school due to an immune system compromised by lack of adequate nutrition.

Thirteen percent of American households are in a state of food insecurity, meaning they are unable to access a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. Without enough food, many people feel the effects of short-term hunger, like headaches, nausea and the inability to concentrate.

Pre-existing health issues are worsened by hunger, making it harder for families to earn money for food. Each year, over 40 million Americans turn to food banks for help—12 million are children.

People seeking food assistance come from all walks of life. Employment is no guarantee that someone will never struggle to provide enough food for their family. In fact, approximately 25 million individuals from working households access foodbanks, and most report regularly depending on the food bank to survive.

Fast Facts

  • Nearly 16 million households in the U.S. face hunger.
  • More than 70 billion pounds of food from manufacturers, growers and retailers goes to waste—more than enough food to feed the 42 million people struggling with hunger in the U.S.
  • Youth who face food insecurity are more likely to require hospitalization.
  • Food insecurity can lead to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and heart disease.
Nearly sixteen million households in the U.S. face hunger.

WHY ARE FOOD BANKS NECESSARY?

People who access food banks come from all walks of life. Some people need support over longer periods, but most require help only occasionally or for a short period of time. Hunger leads to long-term health conditions, especially in young children, and is a barrier to academic success.

A food package may make the difference for a family trying to get back on their feet after a crisis. It can mean that a child doesn’t go to bed hungry, or doesn’t get sick and miss school due to an immune system compromised by lack of adequate nutrition.